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Add Color To Drylock?

Discussion in 'Tegu Enclosures' started by slideaboot, May 15, 2011.

  1. slideaboot

    slideaboot Member 5 Year Member

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    So...I went into Home Depot to get Drylock for this new cage and they were out until this upcoming Tuesday. Which worked out, because I realized I hadn't decided on whether or not to add color to it (which they said they'd do, despite the fact it voids the warranty).

    The question is: Does Drylock, right outta the can, NEED pigment? OK, I know it doesn't "need" it, necessarily, but does it LOOK better with a bit of pigment? The outside wood is being stained a nice blonde-ish sort of stain...Any suggestions or guidance here? We are ALMOST done with this cage and I'm STOKED! Aesop needs a bigger cage yesterday...
  2. james.w

    james.w Active Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I think it depends on what color Drylok you are starting with. I like the gray the way it is, but I think white would be a little much.
  3. TheTeguGurl

    TheTeguGurl Active Member

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    When I used dry lock i just got in in the color it came in the can, then I got a low VOC paint that is for kitchens and bathrooms, any color you want and painted over the drylock it helped seal it too and it looks really nice!
  4. slideaboot

    slideaboot Member 5 Year Member

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    I totally forgot that it already comes in a couple basic colors. So, I'm guessing the white's a bit bright? [hr]
    Oh...what's the difference between oil based and latex-based, as far as a wooden cage is concerned? Is there a difference?
  5. montana

    montana New Member

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    You use roughly twice as much pigment as with a regular base color ...

    Most colors can be made ...
  6. james.w

    james.w Active Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I think it might be, but I have an all white melamine enclosure that isn't bad.
  7. chelvis

    chelvis Active Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I'm using white Drylock on my caiman lizard project right now and i will be painting over it with a pigment, but its for a different effect. Oil base last long but for cage application both work really well. Color is all up to do its hard to say what would look best in your cage.
  8. herpgirl2510

    herpgirl2510 Member

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    I would reccommend tinting it I used all white and it is very bright I have covered the walls with vines but still. I used the tan color for another enclosure it looks nice.
  9. Toby_H

    Toby_H New Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I left the ceiling and any unseeable (is that a word?, it is now...) areas white in order to better reflect light & heat. I use tinted Drylock on all the seeable areas.

    In my opinion, an all white enclosures doesn't look or feel nice to me. Though this is completely a personal choice and if you prefer white there's nothing wrong with that.

    I've tinted Drylock a lot of different shades of gray in making "faux rocks" for backgrounds/inserts for vivariums, terrariums, aquariums, etc. For my Tegu's enclsoure I decided to tint it a "forrest green" for the back & sides with the shelf upright supports, etc tinted brown. I usually talk the clerk into shooting the pigment into a cup of sorts to take home and mix it myself.


    The different between oil based and latex based Drylock is the same as the difference between oil based and latex based paint. I don't know all of the ins and outs of paint, but in all applications I have read the differences latex turned out to be the better choice. If you are painting wood, I suggest you stick with latex.


    Putting a coat of regular paint over the Drylock is certainly an option and will not compromise the Drylock in any way. Though I didn't see a reason to use two products to do the same purpose I could acheive with only one. If you need an exact color, painting the final product makes sense, but if your end goal is simply a general neutral shade of XXXXX, tinting Drylok made the most sense to me.
  10. slideaboot

    slideaboot Member 5 Year Member

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    So, according to some of you...you can paint the drylok AFTER you've applied it and let it dry? Is this the consensus? Any issues with that, that you could foresee?
  11. chelvis

    chelvis Active Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    You can paint over it. Like Toby said if you only want one color than tinting it is the way to go. If you are going with different colors i would suggest painting over the Drylock. When i do that i also let it dry and than spray paint over with a clear gloss just to seal in the new paint. It does not affect the drylock but it helps keep the new outer coat from flaking off.
  12. slideaboot

    slideaboot Member 5 Year Member

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    That's a great idea. Thanks!
  13. Toby_H

    Toby_H New Member 5 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    You are correct... you can paint/seal with Drylok... let the Drylok dry/cure... then apply a simple coat of paint over the Drylok...

    If you do this, be sure to use a Latex/water based paint if you used latex/water based Drylok... Use oil based paint if you used oil based Drylok...
  14. slideaboot

    slideaboot Member 5 Year Member

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    Sweet. Thanks, Toby.

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