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Looks like arrow frogs are next up

dorton

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My wife hates all my reptiles, but loves frogs. I have decided arrow frogs will be the ones. Long story short, I ended up with the new
enclosure you see here with all the plants allready in it. Yes they are all live, but I don't have a clue what they are :mrgreen:

School me on arrow frogs if you have some or have had luck with them in the past.
ralieghshowmay08005.jpg

ralieghshowmay08012.jpg

Thanks
Justin
 

VARNYARD

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I wish I could help bro, but I don't know too much about them other than, they like it humid and damp. They eat fruit flies and pin head crickets, and they are awesome looking with bright colors.

That is an awesome looking set up though, it looks like it will be great for them.
 

Harveysherps

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Black Jungle would be the place to go to find them and get good info on them. I do know that most of them actually eat ants in the wild. The formic acid in the ants is what they use to make themselves toxic. They aren't toxic unless they eats ants . That is what I have been told anyway.
 

DZLife

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Harveysherps said:
Black Jungle would be the place to go to find them and get good info on them. I do know that most of them actually eat ants in the wild. The formic acid in the ants is what they use to make themselves toxic. They aren't toxic unless they eats ants . That is what I have been told anyway.

My Uncle keeps these guys, and he feeds them pinheads and fruit flies...I'm not sure if he provides them ants or not, but they are still at least semi-toxic without the ants...we witnessed it first hand...that was a problem.
 

PuffDragon

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Springtails are also a good feeder. They will even act as a little cleaning crew for your viv and burrow into the substrate. They help decompose left over waste matter.

I thought about trying darts myself, but decided that the whole fruit fly thing would be too much of a pain to enjoy the pure beauty of these little fellas. One colony of B. dubia is enough for me, let alone having to constantly make new cultures of flies.
 

Harveysherps

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DZLife said:
Harveysherps said:
Black Jungle would be the place to go to find them and get good info on them. I do know that most of them actually eat ants in the wild. The formic acid in the ants is what they use to make themselves toxic. They aren't toxic unless they eats ants . That is what I have been told anyway.

My Uncle keeps these guys, and he feeds them pinheads and fruit flies...I'm not sure if he provides them ants or not, but they are still at least semi-toxic without the ants...we witnessed it first hand...that was a problem.
Really I always wondered if it were true. Carpenter ants are what some people feed them. The ants are easy to raise and keep alive so a continuous supply is always around. I was going to get into them. But I decided not too. Guy Rock at RockNReptiles is a good source for carpenter ants.
 

nat

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I have kept darts in the past. I love them and will keep them again (the only thing stopping me right now is that my living room is too cold to have a dart display tank in the winter).

anyways, because darts can range from a couple mm to 1 - 1.5 inches, their care varies depending on the species. I liked the heavier bodied darts like the d. azures and the p. terribillis myself because they were very bold animals (which meant great display animals) and once they were adults I could easily give them 2-3 week old crickets (so no fruit flies or worrying about pinhead supplies). As for the smaller, thumbnail species... I haven't had a lot of experience with them but I wouldn't recommend them to someone just starting out with darts as they are smaller, more delicate, etc. Good beginners darts to look into are d. azures, d. auratas, d. tincs, p. terribillis, etc. Also, some dart frogs do better in pairs while others do well in colonies, so you will have to consider the number of each species you can house in your set up.

overall they are really neat frogs.. I love them, definately a faviorite!
 

nat

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this is the site where I get my darts from:
understoryenterprises.com

I know its a canadian site but next to each species it lists their size, their care and if they do better in groups or in pairs... its a great little resource for helping you pick out which darts might be good for you!
 

DZLife

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PuffDragon said:
Springtails are also a good feeder. They will even act as a little cleaning crew for your viv and burrow into the substrate. They help decompose left over waste matter.

I thought about trying darts myself, but decided that the whole fruit fly thing would be too much of a pain to enjoy the pure beauty of these little fellas. One colony of B. dubia is enough for me, let alone having to constantly make new cultures of flies.

Yeah, I have enough fruit flies flying aroud my house as it is....people keep on leaving food out :$
 

dorton

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Thanks for all the input.
I have been doing a little research, and think I am going to pic up
a trio or so of D.Azures
nm_blue_poison_080425_ssh.jpg
 

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