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Tegu breeding in California

Discussion in 'Tegu Breeding Discussion' started by HowardB, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. HowardB

    HowardB New Member

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    I live just south of L.A. I ran into a guy at the NARBC show in Pasadena last week who was selling CBB Argentine reds and B&Ws. He told me that he now lives in a humid area of Texas, and has no problem breeding tegus. After breeding success in Texas, he moved to California and was unable to breed them successfully. Now, back in Texas, he has success again. He attributes this to the dry California climate, and pointed out that Argentine B&Ws breed like crazy "in the wild" in Florida (and that there are a number of successful breeders in Florida). Anyone else familiar with tegu breeding problems outdoors in dry climates? There must be successful breeders in California, Nevada, etc., aren't there? (I was wondering if a misting system might help). Thanks!
  2. Walter1

    Walter1 Moderator Staff Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    That's an important concern. They are adapted to a hot wet summer and a cool/damn cold winter when they sleep.
    I wonder, emphasize wonder, if in Los Angeles, they were not getting hot enough long enough along with being too dry.
  3. HowardB

    HowardB New Member

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    Interesting thought; hadn't considered that. My understanding is that they breed shortly after coming out of their winter slumber (I guess "hibernation" is a technically incorrect term), when it isn't extremely hot. However, that doesn't mean that they're not "preconditioned" properly in our temperate climate. Not much I can do about the heat in large outdoor cages, but I can increase the humidity with a misting system. Thanks for the reply!

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