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When baking cypress mulch...

turtlepunk

New Member
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404
When baking cypress mulch to kill off any parasites is there a safe way to do it?

How should I do it?
throw portions at a time in a baking tray?
any recommended temps and times?

What do you guys do???
 

james.w

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I just put mine in the cage. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
 

montana

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253
You can cook it at 200 degrees till hot ...

You can also spread it out in the sun and let it dry completely...

I would dry it in the sun even if you were going to bake it ...

Try baking it wet and you will smell why ..
 

jerobi2k

New Member
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227
yeah I concur with Montana, Ive purchased several bags of mulch over the years and found unwanted bugs, Im fine with bugs I purchase but im not keen on the uninvited. I cook it a little warmer then 200 degrees, but Im sure it doesnt matter. for me its just a piece of mind and Ive been doing that since I was about 11yrs old, so its just a routine. :)
 

Toby_H

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It is exceptinoally unlikely that you have parasites in your Cypress Mulch...

If you do, I highly suggest throwing it out and buying fresh mulch from a different source...


It is common for Cypress Mulch to contain Springtails, which are tiny harmless hopping bugs. They require high humidity to survive, so drying the mulch (in the oven or in the sun will work) will kill them, though I feel no need to do this. They actually eat mold & mildew and are a (mildly) beneficial microfauna in your enclosure. Also, since they require high humidity any of them that explore beyond your enclosure will simply die within hours.

I've seen a lot of people on this forum put a lot of energy into getting rid of Springtails or misidentifying them as a hazard. I've had them in reptile enclsoures as well on the surface of fish tanks for many years. I've also cultured them as food for small amphibians.
 

jerobi2k

New Member
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227
yeah I do agree with Toby and many people dont cook mulch but speaking for myself, regardless parasites or just bugs, if it comes in a bag of mulch and isnt purchased as food I dont want it in my pets enclosure. maybe living in FL, where it is high humidity often, bugs might more likely be found. so I play safe and I like it tidy :)
 

tupinambisfamiliaris

Member
5 Year Member
Messages
92
I've never had an issue with cypress and have used it for years. It gets the occaisional wood mite, but that's no real issue. Cooking mulch kind of defeats the purpose to me. Humidity is one of the reasons I use it, and heating it will dry it out a lot faster.
 

Jay&barry

New Member
Messages
10
I know this post is old but if anyone needs more detail...I bake mine in the oven at 300 degrees for 30 minutes stirring it at 15 minutes. I have had no bug problems after 4 years of doing this and I bake mine in a 4 inch deep baking tray to get more use our of each batch. If you ever think you didn't bake it enough you can also boil It too the main thing of importance is high heat. Hope this helps out!
 

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